Sunday, November 24, 2013

You Can Help


Here’s a chance to find out what you know about sea level rise and help an FAU PhD student. Read Betsy Roberts’ article below and then fill out the survey form here:   go to www.kbolter.com  or directly to the survey:   https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1inxk0-KQ3-nl2UrXnRz2j2H_gONuZjJ7jdTuF_G726M/viewform

For your information here is the new FEMA Flood Zone map.  Just zoom in (scroll button or + - buttons) click anywhere on the map and you will see the flood designations for that area.  http://bcgis.maps.arcgis.com/apps/OnePane/basicviewer/index.html?appid=0b1b5ffc6f8440f9ab23d688bb79f063

 
Deerfield Beach, Coconut Creek

agree to assist with sea-level survey

  By Elizabeth Roberts Sun Sentinel Staff Writer    

 Ever see the photograph of a polar bear clinging to a tiny piece of ice amid a great ocean and wonder what you can do to stem sea level rise? A local Ph.D. candidate wants to give every Broward County resident that chance.

Recently, Deerfield Beach and Coconut Creek put out an online call for participation in a survey on the issue.

They agreed to assist with a survey requested by Coral Springs resident Keren Bolter, who is on the cusp of a Ph.D. in geosciences from Florida Atlantic University. The university’s research department is helping with the survey.  

Bolter will use the data for a doctoral thesis comparing the perceived risk of sea level rise with real data. Her goal is to find out if people are concerned — and whether they should be.

 “Why are people buying property at 2 feet above sea level when the sea level is projected to rise up to 2 feet by the year 2060?” she said. “Inland areas think they are safe, but they don’t realize the water comes up through the porous ground.”

Bolter knows of what she speaks. She recently gave a talk for TEDxMiami about the misconceptions related to sea level rise that was later broadcast on a National Public Radio affiliate. The information, Bolter said, is vital to helping planners and emergency personnel identify where people are at greatest   risk.

But of 30 Broward cities she contacted, only Deerfield Beach and Coconut Creek have agreed to help. Ironically, she said, those are among the Broward communities with perhaps the least to worry about.

 “In general, the elevations in Broward County go from north to south, from high to low. Deerfield Beach, in terms of elevation, is close to 10 feet higher than Fort Lauderdale,” Bolter said.

Bolter said she is hoping to get about 1,000 survey respondents.

The survey is available at  www.kbolter.com    through Dec. 31.    

Elizabeth Roberts can be reached at: eroberts@tribune.com

 

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